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Thursday, June 20

 Bonneville Dam, June 12, 2024, in the Columbia River Gorge. (Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times)

Biden administration acknowledges harms of Columbia River dams on Indigenous people
The hydropower dams on the Columbia River flooded villages, disrupted economies and ways of life, and continue to harm people indigenous to the Pacific Northwest, according to a first-of-its-kind federal report released Tuesday. The report provides a summary of the historic, ongoing and cumulative harm to eight Columbia Basin tribes caused by 11 dams built in the Columbia and Snake rivers. It marks the first time the federal government has detailed these harms. Continue reading at The Seattle Times. (Erika Schultz)


A fleet of electric delivery vehicles charges. A new network of stations up and down the West Coast could accelerate the adoption of more electric vehicles across the region. (Mustafa Hussain/Getty Images)

To help fund roads, WA lawmakers eye fee on delivery of online purchases
A fee tacked onto the delivery of many retail and online purchases could generate millions of dollars a year for maintaining city and county roads in Washington. State lawmakers now must decide if it’s an option worth pursuing as they, and local government leaders, wrestle with increasing costs of transportation upkeep and decreasing collections from the gas tax — the primary source of money for road work. Continue reading at The WA State Standard. (Mustafa Hussain)


As summer travel begins to spike, so does Covid cases across the United States. Unlike other respiratory viruses that surge in winter, like the flu and RSV, Covid has established a pattern of spiking in winter and summer, according to Dr. Helen Chu with UW Medicine. Seen here, a busy day at Ronald Reagan National Airport.

Covid is back in Washington just in time for your summer vacation
As Covid continues to settle into everyday life, health experts are noticing it has certain patterns, and a few other changes from the first few years the virus struck. Summer Covid is a thing. This is not what health officials expected from the virus. Sure, there’s the common winter cold and flu season. Officials began noticing Covid cases were on the rise in early June. Viral levels in wastewater, both nationally and in Washington state, were getting higher and higher. As of early June, Washington state was trending slightly higher than the national average. Continue reading at KUOW. (Tim Mossholder)


Print

Associated Press
US acknowledges Northwest dams have devastated the region’s Native tribes

Axios
SCOTUS ruling on Idaho abortion law could affect Washington

Columbian
This law is a lifeline for pregnant workers even as an abortion dispute complicates its enforcement
Cantwell’s bill would boost AI training for small businesses as Clark County companies incorporate technology

Everett Herald
On Juneteenth: ‘We can always say that there is hope’
Boeing lost track of up to 400 faulty 737 Max parts, whistleblower says
‘Financially insolvent’ Marysville schools to get unprecedented oversight
Comment: Juneteenth marked end to slavery; freedom’s taken longer

The Facts Newspaper
City of Seattle awarded nearly $3.2 million to support residential and small businesses transition from fossil fuels to clean, energy efficient appliances

The Inlander
The risk of wildfires is causing some in Spokane County to lose their homeowners insurance

News Tribune
Unable to find one itself, county to pay someone to locate new homeless shelter site
42 families had to move to make room for Puyallup apartments. Why is the lot still empty?
Someone I know uses pronouns I don’t understand. What now? A beginner’s guide to pronouns

Port Townsend Leader
Shellfish harvesting halted for toxicity

Puget Sound Business Journal
IRS ERC tax-credit backlog rises to 1.4M claims
Editor’s notebook: This is a workforce lost in space
Washington is one of the most expensive states for child care

Seattle Times
Seattle commission recommends against new test for police recruits
‘Everyone can do something’ to help pollinators, Woodland Park Zoo says (Liias)
WA police officer run over, seriously injured while trying to arrest suspect
Defense in Auburn Officer Nelson’s murder trial rests without his testimony
King County Council approves crisis care centers plan, mental health funding
Biden administration acknowledges harms of Columbia River dams on Indigenous people

Skagit Valley Herald
Skagit County Clean Water Program set for reauthorization
Judge considers whether to dismiss Skagit County from wrongful death lawsuit

Spokesman Review
Resurrected reality TV series ‘Cops’ to return to Spokane County despite local, nationwide critiques
Opinion:  It’s time to stand up for our most vulnerable citizens

Washington Post
Supreme Court upholds Trump-era tax provision on offshore earnings
How small chemical labs are skirting a U.S.-China crackdown on fentanyl
You don’t have to run your air conditioner 24 hours a day. Here’s what to do
Democrats seek to repeal Comstock abortion rule, fearing Trump crackdown

WA State Standard
Johnson & Johnson pays $123 million to WA following opioid lawsuit
To help fund roads, WA lawmakers eye fee on delivery of online purchases (Liias)
Washington sees steep rise, then slow down in prescriptions to treat opioid addiction

Wenatchee World
Eastmont School District cuts 2 art teaching positions
Washington Apple Commission announces new leader
Stemilt fined $350K after trench cave-in buries, injures worker
WVC to receive funding from Climate-Ready Workforce Initiative
Chelan-Douglas Land Trust acquires 221.6-acre conservation easement
East Wenatchee City Council approves $6 million road improvements on 19th Street
Chelan, Douglas counties deal with organic material waste laws; Winton Manufacturing provides service

Yakima Herald-Republic
Pacific Power outlines program for shutting down power during wildfires

Broadcast

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
11-year-old victim of alleged hate crime in Bellingham tells his story
Pride flag raised at city hall after Newcastle City Council reverses decision
Supreme Court rules against Redmond couple, upholds tax on foreign income
Announced Everett Herald layoffs will cut newsroom staff in half according to union
A call to restrict cell phone use in schools is gaining support amid youth mental health crisis
Relatives of people killed in 2 Boeing Max crashes ask the US to fine the company $24.8 billion

KOMO 4 TV (ABC)
Parents and staff demand answers about Marysville School District’s financial crisis
Newcastle City Council flips decision to raise Pride flag at City Hall after public outcry
Seattle’s Holocaust Center for Humanity vandalized, hate crime investigation underway

KNKX Public Radio
Goodbye plastic air pillows: Amazon shifts to paper filling in packages

KUOW Public Radio
Covid is back in Washington just in time for your summer vacation

KXLY (ABC)
New Washington mental health program for people under 25

Web

Cascadia Daily News
WSDOT plans for $85M fish passage project at I-5, Guide Meridian
New bill aims to ensure permanent funding for Northwest Straits Commission
Washington to launch Apple Health Expansion program for undocumented immigrants 
Bellingham community rallies around hate crime victim; letter writing campaign scheduled

MyNorthwest
1 of 2 late-night Tacoma shootings involve sheriff’s deputies
State sends reinforcements to review Marysville’s struggling school budget
Pride flag raised at Newcastle City Hall after City Council reverses decision

Tuesday, June 18

Screenshot from the City of Rentons HB1110 Virtual Open House

State law means more ‘middle housing’ is coming to Renton
House Bill 1110 was passed last year by the Washington Legislature to allow more “middle housing,” which describes housing such as duplexes, triplexes, fourplexes, fiveplexes, sixplexes, courtyard apartments, cottage housing and townhomes. Intended to encourage more development of middle housing, the bill requires cities to allow a broader range of housing in areas with mostly detached single-family homes. Continue reading at The Renton Reporter. (City of Renton)


Washington State Capitol (Laurel Demkovich/Washington State Standard)

Washington voters want their lawmakers working all year long, poll finds
Most Washington voters want their lawmakers to be at the Legislature in session during the entire year, according to a new poll from the Northwest Progressive Institute, a non-profit based in Redmond. Of the 615 voters polled, 59% said they would support changing the Washington Constitution to allow the state House and state Senate to be in regular session year-round. The Constitution currently limits odd-year sessions to 105 days and even-year sessions to 60 days. The Legislature or the governor can call a special session, but those can’t last longer than 30 days. Continue reading at The Washington State Standard. (Laurel Demkovich)


Washington state, and King County, is experiencing a surge in eviction cases. Tenant advocates say this is a good thing, showing that the state's new program providing attorneys to low-income residents is working. Landlord advocates, however, argue that it's forcing simple problems into complex court proceedings.

Eviction or intervention? Debating Washington’s eviction program as cases surge
The spike in evictions, and backlog of cases, in King County has prompted a debate over how well Washington state’s plan is working to help tenants facing evictions. Washington’s current eviction program…officially began in 2022. The state pays for attorneys to represent low-income tenants facing eviction. The Rental Housing Association of Washington, or RHAW, advocates for independent landlords in the state, many of whom find themselves in a position to go to court when a tenant doesn’t leave their unit. Starting in late 2023, some parts of Washington state began experiencing spikes in evictions shortly after pandemic-era protections began phasing out Continue reading at KUOW. (Allan Vega)


Print

Associated Press
Judge orders railway to pay tribe nearly $400 million

Axios
Scoop: Senate Dems line up behind Heinrich, Schumer’s bump stock ban
Biden moves to help half a million undocumented people married to citizens

Bellingham Herald
An Eastern WA salmon fishing tradition is being stopped. State says it got too popular
Bellingham officials raise Juneteenth flag in show of strength; challenged to ‘do the work’

Capital Press
Hops industry appears headed into market correction
Study suggests taking Washington farmland to create riparian buffers (Van De Wege)
Washington farm settles with AG over harassment, assault allegations

Columbian
Music publishers urge states to investigate Spotify
Lost chances to treat overdose survivors are documented in new Medicare study
Washington’s deadliest route is a well-traveled road that runs from Fife to Everett

Courier-Herald
State superintendent of schools says student privacy won’t diminish

Everett Herald
Marysville school board president resigns amid turmoil
Everett inches closer to Park District affordable housing plan
Lawmakers to confront Boeing CEO on mounting quality and safety issues
Editorial: U.S. Supreme Court ‘ducks’ reason on bump stocks

Federal Way Mirror
Opinion: People and their behaviors drive the legislative bus | Livingston (Wilson, Taylor)

Journal of the San Juan Islands
Washington’s wildfires: where we’ve been, where we are and where we’re going

News Tribune
We all scream when an ice cream truck spills tasty cargo on WA state highway
An Eastern WA salmon fishing tradition is being stopped. State says it got too popular
The biggest Juneteenth celebration in Washington is in Tacoma. Expect live music, food
Opinion: Students don’t have to take on massive debt. The trades need workers and they pay well

Peninsula Daily News
Jefferson County adopts summer fire regulations

Puget Sound Business Journal
Major landlords targeted by class-action lawsuits over pricing
Thousands of businesses could see overtime pay costs spike in July
Comment: Washington employers must close pay gap
Comment: Opinion: How Washington schools can replenish the workforce pipeline
Comment: Seattle needs to take its Stadium District seriously

Renton Reporter
State law means more ‘middle housing’ is coming to Renton

South Whidbey Record
New pursuit law changes rules of the road

Spokesman Review
Is Spokane’s housing market finally leveling? The average home in the county saw a slight decrease in value this year

Tri-City Herald
Fire scorches 200 acres, threatens homes and knocks out power north of Pasco

Washington Post
Most Americans approve of DEI, according to Post-Ipsos poll
What to know about Juneteenth and its historical significance
Biden to waive penalties for undocumented spouses of U.S. citizens
With obesity a major public health threat, U.S. panel releases guidelines for kids
Boeing CEO faces Senate hearing, hours after release of new whistleblower complaint

WA State Standard
Railroad owes nearly $400M to WA tribe, judge rules
Washington’s ferry system steers toward less choppy waters
Washington voters want their lawmakers working all year long, poll finds

Wenatchee World
Davis Canyon brush fire burns 2 acres
Peshastin Bridge closed, repairs to take about a month
Lake Chelan fire surpasses (sic) 3,800 acres, Stehekin meeting Tuesday
Leavenworth City Council votes to allow cottage homes in residential zones

Broadcast

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
Former Seattle police chief Adrian Diaz comes out as gay
US Surgeon General says social media is a danger to youth mental health
Boeing’s CEO is appearing before a Senate panel as a new whistleblower emerges
Judge orders BNSF to pay Washington tribe nearly $400 million for trespassing with oil trains
‘Don’t be afraid to speak up’: Companies to pay $470,000 for failing to protect female farmworkers

KOMO 4 TV (ABC)
Public health, climate experts call summer heat a crisis as temperatures rise
Amazon Labor Union workers vote overwhelmingly in favor of an affiliation with Teamsters

KNKX Public Radio
Amazon’s struggling union joins forces with the Teamsters
Seattle Student Union says $2M telehealth plan isn’t enough

KUOW Public Radio
Eviction or intervention? Debating Washington’s eviction program as cases surge
More people die on south Seattle streets, where wide streets encourage fast driving
‘I am a gay Latino man,’ says former Seattle Chief Adrian Diaz after stepping down

KXLY (ABC)
Spokane County Emergency Management considering new alert for fast-moving wildfires

Web

Cascadia Daily News
What makes Whatcom’s trash and recycling system unusual?
City outlines next six years of transportation network improvements 

Crosscut
Scientists seek ways to protect PNW rainforests from wildfires
UW grad students get 36% raise as academic unions gain traction

MyNorthwest
King County deputies recover 40 pounds of meth in massive drug bust
Marysville school board president steps down amid turbulent period for school district

The Urbanist
Metro Adding Hydrogen Buses, Auditor Casts Doubt on Fleet Electrification Strategy

Monday, June 17

I-5 in Seattle. Photo: Chona Kasinger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Seattleites are driving less
Driving has fallen dramatically in Washington over the last few decades, and Seattle has the second-fewest miles driven among large U.S. cities, according to recent transportation data. Contributors to the state and city’s success, according to the Frontier Group’s analysis, include the 1991 Commute Trip Reduction law, which requires large employers to incentivize alternative commuting methods, and expanded investments in light rail and bus service. Continue reading at Axios. (Chona Kasinger)


People walk by the Dream Girls, a strip club in Seattle’s Sodo neighborhood. It is the first strip club in Washington to get a liquor license in nearly 50 years thanks to a law passed this year. (Lindsey Wasson / The Associated Press)

Seattle strip club becomes first in WA to serve alcohol in decades
A Seattle strip club is the first in Washington to get a liquor license in nearly 50 years. A law passed this year paved the way by requiring the liquor and cannabis board to repeal a comparatively Victorian statute — the majority of U.S. states already allow alcohol in adult entertainment establishments. Gov. Jay Inslee signed into law a bill dubbed the “Strippers’ Bill of Rights” in March. It took effect in June. Continue reading at The Seattle Times. (Lindsey Wasson)


A memorial with three crosses hangs on a chain-link fence along Totem Beach Road on the Tulalip Reservation on March 8, 2023.

Car crashes take deadly toll on Native Americans in Washington state
Fatal traffic crashes are up in Washington state, and they are hitting especially hard among Native American communities, according to the Washington Traffic Safety Commission. Deadly crash rates are at least three times higher among Native Americans than any other race in Washington. “The fatality rates are so much higher than any other race within our state,” Washington Traffic Safety Commission tribal liaison Penny Rarick told a June 3 meeting of the Washington House Transportation Committee. Continue reading at KUOW. (Megan Farmer)


Print

Axios
Seattleites are driving less

Bellingham Herald
Bellingham’s 116-acre land purchase will help connect existing paths, extend Bay to Baker Trail

Columbian
Columbia River Mental Health program fills medical gap, reaches out to homeless
Opinion: In Our View: It’s too soon to answer this I-5 Bridge question

Everett Herald
FAA investigating counterfeit titanium in Boeing and Airbus jets
Family: ‘Manic episode’ preceded trooper shooting man on I-5 near Everett
Comment: Ruling on abortion pill access may be short-lived
Comment: This conversation may be recorded
Editorial: Men, boys could use a little help to be better men (Lovick)

News Tribune
After LGBTQ resolution failed, this Pierce County school board meeting got heated
Puyallup schools won’t say what jobs they cut to tackle deficit. Here’s what we found out

Olympian
Look inside the creation of the Billy Frank Jr. statue that will represent Washington state in D.C. (Lekanoff)

Peninsula Daily News
Sequim chamber to host tax credit event

Puget Sound Business Journal
Noncompete ban faces first legal hurdle
Microsoft delays rollout of AI feature over security concerns
The National Observer: Changes coming to homebuying after lawsuit

Seattle Times
Seattle strip club becomes first in WA to serve alcohol in decades
SCOTUS homelessness decisions’ impacts in Washington could be unique
Violence prevention programs in school are one way to keep kids safe, experts say
Defense in Auburn officer’s murder trial rests without offering evidence or witnesses

Spokesman Review
Are extracurriculars the key to fighting skipping, isolation and phone addiction in kids? Spokane Public Schools hopes so
Comment: As Farm Bill talks continue, look to Washington’s contributions to food production, safety and security

Tri-City Herald
‘That’s not for me.’ Tri-Cities graduate overcomes homelessness to attend college

Washington Post
Surgeon general calls for social media warning labels
Closing asset loophole could add billions to tax collections, IRS says
What researchers have learned about summer learning loss and how to stop it

Yakima Herald-Republic
Crews make progress on fires near Zillah and Wapato; evacuation level lowered

Broadcast

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
SPD’s interim police chief focused on preventing future school shootings
Upcoming construction: SDOT to prepare bridges for next big earthquake
A middle schooler in Bellingham was allegedly attacked because he is black
State of Emergency declared as Pioneer Fire continues to burn along the north shore of Lake Chelan

KOMO 4 TV (ABC)
HearMeWA: Washington launches youth hotline to address mental health, safety

KNKX Public Radio
Material could help prevent algal blooms in Moses Lake
The world is farming more seafood than it catches. Is that a good thing?

KUOW Public Radio
Car crashes take deadly toll on Native Americans in Washington state
As Boeing looks to buy a key 737 supplier, a whistleblower says the problems run deep
King County prosecutors have notified schools of 69 felony gun charges against students
Downtown Seattle’s ‘zombie’ office buildings could get second life as apartments under new rules

KXLY (ABC)
Spokane law enforcement officers will not face charges in deadly shooting of robbery suspect

Web

Cascadia Daily News
Skagit County approves controversial gravel mine

Crosscut
County audit details grim conditions at Capitol Hill youth jail

MyNorthwest
Seattle school to say goodbye to cell phones in the fall
UW fires director of primate research center after state probe into program
Pioneer Fire on north shore of Lake Chelan deemed ‘disaster,’ continues to spread

Friday, June 14

A patient prepares to take the first of two combination pills, mifepristone, for a medication abortion. Gov. Jay Inslee’s office is considering what to do with Washington state’s stockpile of the abortion pill... (Charlie Riedel / AP, 2022)

WA considers next steps with abortion pill stockpile after Supreme Court ruling
The governor’s office is considering what to do with Washington state’s stockpile of the abortion pill mifepristone in the wake of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling Thursday that maintained access to the medication. The medication in the state stockpile expires in about two years, and the governor’s office is considering its options, including distribution of the pills, Mike Faulk, a spokesperson for Inslee, said Thursday. Continue reading at The Seattle Times. (Charlie Riedel)


Part of the Okanogan wildfire complex flares up on August 21, 2015 in the hills near Omak. The fires, which killed three firefighters and critically injured another, threatened homes and communities throughout the area. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)

Local governments want say in crafting Washington’s new wildfire protection rules
The last time the state Building Code Council crafted rules for protecting homes from the threat of wildfire, city and county officials criticized them as confusing, expensive and overreaching. Those rules are gone. As the state looks at drawing new wildfire risk maps and implementing new codes, local governments want more say in hopes of producing regulations that are understandable, affordable and help the communities most at risk. Continue reading at The WA State Standard. (Stephen Brashear)


Collage of baby at daycare with graph elements. Photo courtesy of Istock.com.

Off the Charts: 87% of Washington voters say child care is a priority
A majority of Washington voters across party lines identified child care as a priority—and that they want to see politicians tackle it. The poll reflects pressures Washington parents know too well. If you want to raise a child in this state, be prepared to drop an average of $14,000 a year on child care. And that’s if you find a spot—an estimated 600,000 Washington kids in need of care don’t have licensed child care, according to state data. Continue reading at KUOW. (iStock)


Print

Associated Press
Makah Tribe to once again harpoon whales

Axios
How abortion pill challenges may rise again
Study: Seattle area is unprepared for climate disasters
Supreme Court throws out Trump-era ban on gun bump stock

Bellingham Herald
Advocacy group’s pollution report raises red flags about Bellingham’s waterfront
Whatcom County rescinds bacteria-related swimming advisories at three popular beaches
New CDC, CBP rules are about to make it much harder to bring your dog across the border

Capital Press
USDA expects slightly larger U.S. cherry crop, but Washington’s is smaller

Columbian
Woodland port leases last section of Columbia River access for heavy industry
Officer in Saturday’s Vancouver waterfront shooting involved in two other fatal shootings
Community Foundation launches loan program to help nonprofits build affordable housing

Everett Herald
Boeing discloses new quality problem on 787 Dreamliner jets
From around state, authorities simulate ‘terrorist attack’ in Arlington

News Tribune
‘Sick of these cowards’: Racism at council meeting sparks calls to curb virtual speech
Environmental group triumphs over Port of Tacoma in appeal connected to water pollution
Opinion: Tacoma landlord says new tenants’ rights are a disaster. If only it was that simple

Puget Sound Business Journal
This Seattle-area county leads the nation in wage growth
Most Americans still struggle to get away from work while on vacation

Seattle Times
Seattle-area dental insurance is ‘like a joke.’ But few are smiling
WA considers next steps with abortion pill stockpile after Supreme Court ruling

Spokesman Review
Juneteenth 2024: How and where to ‘bring celebration to Spokane’
Supreme Court rejects challenge to abortion pill access after Spokane judge blocked restrictions
Spokane apartment management company agrees to pay nearly $330,000 after federal fraud claims
EWU student graduating Saturday as a mom credits support programs for her ability to stay in school

Washington Post
Court rejects abortion pill challenge, but what happens next?
Supreme Court strikes down Trump-era federal ban on bump stock devices

WA State Standard
WA voters want more child care investments, new poll finds
Local governments want say in crafting Washington’s new wildfire protection rules

Broadcast

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
Biggest hotel brands sued by Seattle law firm for price-fixing
FAA Chief admits agency’s previous oversight approach was “too hands off”
After cybersecurity event, Seattle Public libraries slowly coming back online
Seattle City Council takes steps to expand use of automated license plate readers
One Seattle school to lock down students’ cellphones this fall; others expected to follow
Long-time Bellevue School District special education teacher accused of molesting student

KNKX Public Radio
Washington officials plan to release abortion pill stockpile after SCOTUS upholds access

KUOW Public Radio
Off the Charts: 87% of Washington voters say child care is a priority
Locking up students’ cellphones? This Seattle school is about to try it

KXLY (ABC)
Moses Lake School District considers additional budget cuts
New affordable senior living apartments coming to Spokane Valley
Locals in downtown Spokane call for increased safety measures at site of deadly hit-and-run

Web

Cascadia Daily News
Bellingham police investigating hate crime against sixth-grader

Crosscut
SCOTUS backs Starbucks in case over reinstating fired workers
WA carbon prices lower than expected in second year of auctions
Supreme Court abortion pill ruling not likely to impact Washington
Diplomas & day care: Spokane school helps teens navigate parenthood

MyNorthwest
90 Lynnwood residents — mostly seniors — on verge of homelessness

Thursday, June 13

Pacific Northwest still cool on built-to-rent houses
Despite a chronic need here for affordable housing, the national trend to build houses for rent, not for sale, hasn’t gained traction in the Pacific Northwest. With mortgage rates perched near record highs for the year, there has been a proliferation of such housing in many communities across the U.S. They offer residents property management perks without down payments or long-term commitments — and no mortgages. Continue reading at Axios. (Sarah Grillo)


Boxes of the drug mifepristone sit on a shelf. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed, File)

Unanimous Supreme Court preserves access to widely used abortion medication
The Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously preserved access to a medication that was used in nearly two-thirds of all abortions in the U.S. last year, in the court’s first abortion decision since conservative justices overturned Roe v. Wade two years ago. The nine justices ruled that abortion opponents lacked the legal right to sue over the federal Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the medication, mifepristone, and the FDA’s subsequent actions to ease access to it. The case had threatened to restrict access to mifepristone across the country, including in states where abortion remains legal. Continue reading at The Seattle Times. (Allen G. Breed)


Maryann Griffin and Sandra Mears discuss where to hang a print of Frida Kahlo’s “Self-Portrait with Monkeys” in their new home, May 29, 2024. (Genna Martin/Cascade PBS)

For older renters, Western WA’s housing boom can sow insecurity
Data analysis by AARP shows 6,889 adults 55 and older are expected to experience homelessness this year in Washington state. The homeless population is getting older nationally and locally. The median home sale price in King County has topped $1 million. Median rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the Seattle metro area is nearly 1,900/month. “We have skyrocketing housing costs here in the Puget Sound,” said Cathy McCaul, AARP Washington’s advocacy director. “The more marginalized and more vulnerable in the community are feeling more susceptible to these shifts. Especially if you’re on a fixed income it is doubly, triply, more difficult to maintain stable housing.” Continue reading at Crosscut. (Genna Martin)


Print

Axios
Pacific Northwest still cool on built-to-rent houses
Supreme Court preserves abortion pill access after tossing challenge. 

Capital Press
Farmworker pay rules face suits from both sides
9th Circuit weighs Endangered Species Act pre-emption of Klamath water rights
Editorial: A ‘fanciful’ plan for Washington’s energy future
Editorial: We must get real about looming water crisis

Columbian
Thefts of charging cables pose yet another obstacle to appeal of electric vehicles
More Clark County street drugs include more than one illicit substance. Combination makes treatment more difficult

Everett Herald
Pride flag vandalism raises concerns on Whidbey Island
How will radio collars work on reintroduced grizzlies in North Cascades?
As deadly overdoses decline, Snohomish County builds on what’s working
Free Snohomish County program offers training for manufacturing careers
How can Edmonds make new schools more sustainable? Students have ideas
Editorial: Utilitarian but sturdy restrooms should be a relief

The Inlander
Cannabis is a growing business, but Olympia is limiting its impact in Spokane County
Lime returns to Spokane later than usual with a stricter city contract that aims for ‘more accountability’
As Instagram updates its features to prevent youth cyberbullying, Inland Northwest organizations weigh in on how social media affects the communities they serve

News Tribune
You might see picketers today outside a Tacoma hospital. Here’s what’s happening
Thinking of walking your dog without a leash? Tacoma leash law violators face $513 fine
Drivers should expect delays on the Tacoma Narrows Bridge this weekend during repairs

New York Times
Live Updates: Supreme Court Maintains Broad Access to Abortion Pill
Supreme Court, in Starbucks Ruling, Curbs Labor Regulator’s Authority

Olympian
Olympia volunteers repaint ‘Rainbow Rails’ after longtime attraction was defaced
What will civilian oversight of law enforcement look like in Olympia? Now there’s a plan

Peninsula Daily News
Clallam sheriff pursuing $9.6M grant for public safety facility

Port Townsend Leader
Plans to improve ferry system include added service for PT
Washington State Ferries to host two virtual public meetings
Pride features affirmation, inclusivity, visibility, rebellion and love

Puget Sound Business Journal
UW President Ana Mari Cauce to retire next year
Bellevue mayor credits Amazon for city’s affordable housing gains

Seattle Times
Makah Tribe will again be allowed to hunt gray whales off WA coast
Unanimous Supreme Court preserves access to widely used abortion medication

Spokesman Review
Evacuation level lowered for fire southwest of Spokane
Washington state law requires hospitals to provide emergency abortions, Inslee says

Washington Post
Fed forecasts just one rate cut this year as inflation fight grinds on

WA State Standard
U.S. Supreme Court rejects attempt to limit access to abortion pill
How a college football star helped launch Washington’s new youth mental health helpline

Broadcast

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
Popular King County beaches closed due to high bacteria levels
Gun violence continues to escalate in Seattle, neighborhoods on edge
Senators examine youth vaping epidemic, call for more enforcement over illegal products
Shoreline residents fighting to save trees to be removed in city’s 175th street improvement project
Supreme Court, siding with Starbucks, makes it harder for NLRB to win court orders in labor disputes

KOMO 4 TV (ABC)
High bacteria levels close several Seattle-area beaches
Seattle City Council committee approves adding license plate readers to all SPD vehicles

KNKX Public Radio
After nearly 25 years, federal officials approve a limited Makah whale hunt

KUOW Public Radio
Following 3 Seattle area teens’ shooting deaths, community leaders call for structural gun violence solutions

KXLY (ABC)
Grant County person dies of hantavirus, typically carried by rodents
Complaint lodged against Councilman Al Merkel alleging transparency violations

NW Public Radio
Federal grant to help people in northeastern Washington get hooked up to the power grid

Web

Cascadia Daily News
Nooksack Basin treaty tribes want to secure water rights for future generations
EMS reviewing transport data after claims by Lummi Nation of inadequate emergency response 
Opinion: Realtors, farmers agree: water adjudication will push sprawl, won’t save salmon

Crosscut
For older renters, Western WA’s housing boom can sow insecurity
UW President Ana Mari Cauce announces plans to step down in 2025

The Urbanist
County’s Plan for Redeveloping Downtown Campus Still Shrouded in Mystery