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Tuesday, November 29

The Seattle Times

Rep. Simmons: Without regular prison visits, WA lawmakers cannot address issues of incarceration
This month, more than 20 new legislators were elected to serve Washington, joining me and my fellow legislators in the House and Senate. My colleagues and I are responsible for voting on the billion-dollar budgets for the Washington Department of Corrections, as well as the laws that determine who goes to prison and for how long. Yet few of my colleagues have ever even stepped foot inside of a prison. As many know, I am the first formerly incarcerated person elected to the Washington Legislature. I spent 30 months in the state prison system and know how infrequently lawmakers visit these facilities. Though we meet with various stakeholders including correctional professionals, law enforcement and community advocates and activists in the process of crafting legislation, we rarely hear from a very important voice — incarcerated Washingtonians. Continue reading at The Seattle Times. (Gabriel Campanario)


A person holding a sleeping bag walking into a cold weather shelter.

Cold weather shelters around western Washington open ahead of winter storm
With freezing temperatures and potential snow headed to Washington this week, multiple local agencies are offering cold weather shelters to the public. Cold weather shelters typically open when overnight temperatures are expected to be below 34 degrees F. Below are a list of places in Snohomish, King and Pierce Counties where you can go if you or someone you know are looking to escape the chill. Continue reading at KOMO News. (KATU)


The sun dial near the Legislative Building is shown under cloudy skies, Thursday, March 10, 2022, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Washington lawmakers were wrapping up their work Thursday before planning to adjourn the legislative session.

What’s next for Washington’s drug possession law?
In February 2021, the Washington Supreme Court struck down as unconstitutional the long-standing state law that had made illegal drug possession a felony. The Blake decision, handed down as that year’s legislative session was underway, threw a vast array of drug convictions into question, and left lawmakers scrambling to agree on how Washington should treat possession of drugs, including cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine, moving forward. Senator Dhingra, who chairs the Senate Law and Justice Committee, said that while lawmakers may disagree on where on the criminal penalty scale drug possession should fall, they will likely designate it as either a misdemeanor or gross misdemeanor. But offering treatment “has to be the primary focus.” Continue reading at The Seattle Times. (Ted S. Warren)


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Aberdeen Daily World
Westport links proposal undergoing review
State drops spring bear hunt

Bellingham Herald
Some Whatcom roads might not get plowed right away this winter. Here’s why
Cherry Point tax decision could be worth millions to Whatcom County
Whatcom child care tax takes the lead in latest ballot count

Capital Press
Easterday judge dismisses U.S. complaint against law firm

Columbian
Editorial: In Our View: Protect, grow Washington’s urban canopy
Editorial: In Our View: Declining college enrollments a troubling omen

Everett Herald
Medicare open enrollment ends Dec. 7
Driver shortage prompts Community Transit’s trip cut proposal
Comment: Every empty chair speaks to need for gun control
Comment: Count on abortion returning to the ballot in 2024

Journal of the San Juan Islands
San Juan County Council briefed on ferry updates (Lekanoff)

News Tribune
Opening statements in Pierce Sheriff Troyer’s trial pushed again. Here’s what’s next

Olympian
3 fire stations in West Thurston County are set to close after voters reject levies
Thurston sets public hearing on new district map as measure to expand commission passes
$16 million was spent by outside groups on the WA midterm. These 5 groups spent the most
Thurston County, state DES join Olympia’s effort to combat flooding from sea level rise
Thurston commission OKs rules allowing homeless camps to be permitted with flexibility
Olympia school district to launch new early childhood education program in 2023

Puget Sound Business Journal
‘Seattle is back,’ mayor declares at downtown tree-lighting ceremony
Why solutions to Seattle’s affordable housing shortage remain elusive
Seattle-area Ridwell workers vote to join union

Seattle Times
Seattle advocates reflect on life of Zoey Martinez, seek protection for trans community
What’s next for Washington’s drug possession law? (Dhingra, Davis)
WA attorney general seeks $1.5M to combat organized retail crime
Op-Ed: Without regular prison visits, WA lawmakers cannot address issues of incarceration (Simmons)

Skagit Valley Herald
Nearly all Skagit County ballots have been counted

Spokesman Review
Spokane Public Schools plans to ask voters to fund next round of new buildings
Spokane expected to get 8-12 inches of snow, mostly on Wednesday
Spokane property taxes to increase in 2023 after City Council overrides mayor’s veto

Tri-City Herald
Update | Snow, slick roads close I-84 both directions in east Oregon. Winter storm warning
Safety, new high schools and more at stake on Tri-Cities ballots. What districts are asking for

Wenatchee World
Douglas County PUD enters contract with Colville Tribes for summer Chinook rearing, transferring
Chelan County PUD closes Sage Hills Trails System until April for mule deer and other wildlife

Yakima Herald-Republic
Yakima County, Yakama Reservation lift burn bans as air quality improves
Yakima County’s jobless rate ties for lowest ever in October
Hearing postponed for Yakima County solar projects

Broadcast

KING 5 TV (NBC)
Man charged with hate crime for yelling ‘China virus’ before headbutt

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
Sea-Tac Airport security lines stretch into parking garage two mornings in a row
Cold weather shelters open across western Washington as wintry weather moves in
Washington to decommission COVID response site this week
UW releases report detailing potential effects of “Big One” on Western Washington bridges

KOMO 4 TV (ABC)
Cold weather shelters around western Washington open ahead of winter storm
Seattle City Council proposes $10 increase to vehicle license fees
Average Seattle gas price is 43 cents lower than last month

KUOW Public Radio
First snow of the season arrives in seattle
Seattle-area snow plow routes activated as first snow falls
Invasive crab population keeps booming in Washington
A new crisis line for Native people in Washington state

KXLY (ABC)
Spokane City Council considering cap on food delivery app fees
Spokane City Council overrides mayor’s veto of property tax ordinance

Q13 TV (FOX)
Staffing shortages to bring changes for Mt. Rainier National Park visitors this winter
WDFW: Nearly 250,000 invasive European green crabs removed from Washington waters

Web

Crosscut
Bear with us: Grizzlies may be coming back to the North Cascades

MyNorthwest
100 Flights cancelled out of Sea-Tac as region braces for snow
Several schools delayed, closed as winter storms approach
Seattle students declare ‘victory’ in fight to fund mental health counselors

West Seattle Blog
CORONAVIRUS: Another West Seattle COVID-testing site shuts down

Monday, November 28

Lawmakers meet on the Senate floor, on March 10, 2022, at the Capitol in Olympia.

Crime, climate, abortion on docket in legislative session warm-up
State lawmakers return to the Capitol this week for hearings on a wide range of issues they expect to debate in the 2023 session. And for the first time in three years, nearly all of them will be conducted in-person with an option for the public to participate remotely. The annual assemblage is known as Committee Days. As the name implies, each House and Senate committee, plus panels with members from both chambers, gather to learn what has occurred since the last session and what lies in the next that begins Jan. 9. “It’s like our professional development days.” said Rep. Lillian Ortiz-Self, D-Mukilteo. “We need to get the most up-to-date information on those subjects members are interested in and more than likely going to be diving into in the next session or two.” Crime rates, carbon pricing, abortion access and affordable housing are among topics for discussion. So too are staffing challenges for Washington State Ferries and early learning centers. And there will be updates on drought, wildfires and building of behavioral health facilities. In all, 39 hearings are planned from Tuesday through Friday. Continue reading at Everett Herald. (Ted S. Warren)


Laurie Jinkins, D-Tacoma, has again been elected Speaker of the House by state Democratic lawmakers.

Washington House Democrats elect leadership team for 2023 session
Tacoma Democrat Laurie Jinkins was re-elected for a third time to her position as Speaker of the Washington state House during a caucus reorganization meeting on Monday. House Democrats elected seven leaders during the meeting, including Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon of West Seattle, who will replace Rep. Pat Sullivan as House Majority Leader. Twelve new caucus members also were welcomed to the House Democrats, who managed to hold onto their majority status after the Nov. 8 general election. The Democrats now hold 58 out of the 98 seats. “The people of Washington have again chosen Democrats to lead in our state Legislature, and our caucus is ready to get to work on their behalf,” said Jinkins in a press release. “I want to thank my colleagues for their continued trust and confidence in me. More than ever, our caucus is reflective of the many diverse communities that make up this great state, and that ultimately makes the work we do better.” Continue reading at The Olympian. (Ted S. Warren)


The Washington Capitol building in Olympia is seen on Jan. 5, 2017. State leaders expect they'll have more money to spend in the budget they'll craft in 2023 than forecasters originally predicted.

State sees increase in revenue forecast but legislators will likely disagree on how to spend it
Ahead of the next Legislature’s budget writing year, Washington’s tax collections are again higher than expected. Despite concerns that revenues were slowing with a possible recession, the state revenue projections for the budget cycle ending in 2023 has increased by nearly $762 million, according to the Washington State Economic and Revenue Forecast Council. The Legislature will come back in 2023 and write a budget for the next two years. This forecast suggests they’ll have about $66.2 billion to work with. The last two-year operating budget, which was written in 2021, spent nearly $59 billion plus federal COVID-19 relief funding. As revenue grew even more for the state, the budget grew, too, giving legislators more than $5 billion to adjust the budget the following session. Now, legislators will again have about $4.5 billion more than last year to spend. Continue reading at The Spokesman Review. (Jesse Tinsley)


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Bellingham Herald
Snowing in Bellingham These are the main roads the city plows
This mixed-use affordable housing project on its way to Bellingham waterfront
Here’s when freezing temperatures, light snow may arrive in Whatcom County
 
Capital Press
USDA to survey farmers and ranchers for 2022 Census of Agriculture

Everett Herald
Crime, climate, abortion on docket in legislative session warm-up (Ortiz-Self, Goodman)
Driver shortage prompts Community Transit’s trip cut proposal
Audit: Snohomish County lacks data-driven approach to homeless services
Comment: To change gun culture, look to cigarettes, seat belts
Comment: Kids face daunting gap for behavioral health services
Comment: Future of Native sovereignty and children at stake
Comment: Education builds dreams, but not necessarily for refugees
Comment: Capital gains tax will give back to kids, families
Editorial: Answer for environment, maritime jobs blowing in wind

News Tribune
Sheriff Troyer called cops on newspaper carrier almost 2 years ago. Here’s a timeline
Watch: Jury selection for Pierce County Sheriff Ed Troyer’s trial livestreamed from court
Tacoma council passes $4 billion budget. How much is for police, homeless and more?

Olympian
Washington House Democrats elect leadership team for 2023 session (Jinkins, Fitzgibbon, Ortiz-Self, Stonier, Ramel, Sullivan)
Thurston commission OKs rules allowing homeless camps to be permitted with flexibility
Derek Sanders declares victory in Thurston County Sheriff’s race, starts preparing for role

Puget Sound Business Journal
Regional Homelessness Authority makes progress despite controversy
Why the staffing crisis at Washington hospitals is ‘here to stay’
Seattle politicians debate how payroll tax dollars should be spent

Seattle Medium
Ports In Washington To Share $71 Million
Powwows Allowed Again in State Prisons
U.S. Senator Murray’s New Political Power
Food Insecurity Is Still A Major Concern For Many Families
Different Dispositions on Local Crime Data

Seattle Times
One WA school district helped homeless students graduate. Can others?
Academy warned Tacoma of violent training episode by officer later charged in Manuel Ellis’ death
Editorial: On school safety, status quo is unacceptable
Opinion: Apprenticeships help tear down barriers for women in the workplace

Skagit Valley Herald
Chinook threshold decreased for endangered orcas
Former Mount Vernon mayor dies at age 64

Spokesman Review
State sees increase in revenue forecast but legislators will likely disagree on how to spend it (Wilson L., Ormsby)
Cantwell, McMorris Rodgers at center of year-end push in Congress to protect kids online
Dan Newhouse, Northwest farmers make last-ditch push for farm workforce bill whose fate lies with Crapo, Senate Republicans
Spokane set to receive ‘several million dollars’ as part of finalized settlement with Monsanto over water pollution
Superior Court wants another judge, but the Spokane County commissioners don’t want to pay for it
Getting There: Weather, shortages blamed for delays to Spokane roadwork
Spokane Valley renewing police contract with county Sheriff’s Office

Tri-City Herald
Washington’s newest national park near Tri-Cities honored with tourist passport stamp
Washington State University must acknowledge UI killings are affecting its students too
‘Wave of the future’? New method better breaks down sewage into methane for electricity

Walla Walla Union Bulletin
Free COVID-19 at-home testing to continue in Washington through end of year

Wenatchee World
Wenatchee approves $142 million 2023 budget
Chelan County PUD increases contract time, budget for new Service Center cultural resources work

Yakima Herald-Republic
Yakima County commissioners unhappy state agency OKs solar farms
Yakima County receives 152 applications for $155M in federal ARPA funds
Editorial: Politicians should heed voters’ clear message (Braun, Wilcox)

Broadcast

KING 5 TV (NBC)
61% believe flexible plastics are recyclable in curbside bins. They’re not.
Snohomish County cold weather shelters open as low temperatures arrive

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
‘Anybody can be a hero’: Local writer’s comic books promote inclusivity, empower LGBTQ readers
VIDEO: Seattle City Council approves additional mental health funding after Ingraham High School shooting

KOMO 4 TV (ABC)
Businesses near Westfield Southcenter Mall discuss safety concerns

Q13 TV (FOX)
Reforestation options vary following wildfires

Web

Crosscut
Gov. Inslee plans to ban gas-powered cars by 2035. Is it doable? (Liias, Fey)

MyNorthwest
Pierce County Sheriff trial to begin after illness delay
‘Anybody can be a hero’: Local writer’s comic books promote inclusivity, empower LGBTQ readers
King County has first pediatric flu death in three years

The Stranger
Nelson “Egregiously Misconstrued” Statement from Northwest African American Museum Director

West Seattle Blog
SURVEY: Last call to answer Seattle Parks questions about community centers
UPDATE: Sewage leak closes Lincoln Park beach
WATER TAXI ALERT: West Seattle, Vashon service ‘temporarily reduced’ starting Monday

Wednesday, November 23

President Joe Biden stands at a podium next to U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona

Student loan-payment freeze extended as courts weigh debt relief
The Biden administration announced Tuesday that it will again extend a pandemic-era pause on payments for federal student loans as courts weigh the fate of its debt forgiveness program. Officials had hoped to have forgiven some debt by then so borrowers’ balances would be lower, or in some cases wiped altogether, before payments resumed. But Education Secretary Miguel Cardona said the department will extend the pause again until the courts reinstate Biden’s debt relief program or resolve ongoing lawsuits. Continue reading at The Washington Post. (Michael Cadenhead)


Scientists studying cause of death of Coho salmon

Common chemical in tires caused mass Coho salmon deaths in Puget Sound, scientists say
Since the early 1990s, scientists up and down the West coast have known about a mysterious killer lurking in the waters of urban creeks wiping out populations of Coho salmon. What they discovered was a toxin called 6PPD-quinone produced when the common tire preservative 6PPD mixes with oxygen. As tires age, the rubber starts to peel off leaving bits and pieces in their path. When it rains anything that doesn’t soak into soil becomes stormwater pollution, eventually ending up in local waterways where every fall Coho salmon return to spawn. Continue reading at KING 5. (KING 5)


Some medications in short supply at local pharmacies as demand outstrips production
Prescription drug shortages are becoming a growing concern as pharmaceuticals ranging from Adderall for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder to amoxicillin for infections run into short supply. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has said that the Adderall shortage could be an issue until the new year, affecting both adult and child prescriptions, while the amoxicillin shortage could extend well into next year. States such as Oregon have reported amoxicillin shortages, while UW Medicine on Monday warned about the Adderall shortage. Continue reading at The Bellingham Herald.


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Associated Press
Court: Long sentence for Black man who killed at 17 stands
Fish-farming net pens banned, citing salmon threat
Walmart manager opens fire in break room, killing 6
Pierce County sheriff’s trial delayed, lawyers say he has flu
Explainer: Why a rail strike is looming, and the wide impact it’d have on the economy 
Public safety accounts urge caution on Twitter after changes
Judge orders Amazon to stop retaliations against organizers

Aberdeen Daily World
Increased prices don’t just affect consumers
Dungeness crab season delayed until at least mid-December

Auburn Reporter
Giving thanks while on stolen land in the Seattle area

Bellingham Herald
Some medications in short supply at local pharmacies as demand outstrips production 
Whatcom children hospitalized at rate four times higher than in the last five years
Three Whatcom, Skagit high schools receive false calls of an active campus shooter

Capital Press
Questions to ask before entering the carbon credit market
Researchers to study climate change impact on Dungeness crab

The Daily News
County commissioners split on considering agreement to pay for HOPE Village

Everett Herald
Providence responds to critical letter from Everett, county councils
State won’t keep federal money from Lake Stevens for ADA issues

News Tribune
Tents at new Tacoma homeless site leaked during Tuesday’s rain. City says it’s been fixed

Olympian
Modular building on west Capitol Campus almost ready for Newhouse staff

Puget Sound Business Journal
Starbucks to shutter a 4th unionized Seattle store, citing safety
Opinion: Editor’s notebook: Cost of living is shared burden

Seattle Medium
Food Insecurity Is Still A Major Concern For Many Families
Different Dispositions on Local Crime Data
City Council Committee Approves $4 Million In Mental Health Resources For Students In Seattle
Activist: Addressing Violence In Schools Requires A Comprehensive Approach

Seattle Times
Thousands of U.S. schools, including in WA, fail to count homeless students

Spokesman Review
Kuney to head Washington State Association of Counties
LaCrosse residents unite to revitalize downtown and preserve tiny southeast Whitman County community
Spokane County sheriff’s use of helicopters, infrared imaging to survey Camp Hope at center of latest legal dispute

Tri-City Herald
ACLU says Richmond School Board proposal could lead to free speech ‘abuse’ and ‘censorship’

Walla Walla Union Bulletin
Walla Walla City Council narrows focus in city manager search to one candidate

Washington Post
Gunman who killed 6 at Virginia Walmart was store employee, police say
Supreme Court clears way for Trump tax returns to go to Congress
Fauci urges updated coronavirus shots in ‘final message’ from White House
Student loan-payment freeze extended as courts weigh debt relief

Broadcast

KING 5 TV (NBC)
False reports of school shootings across western Washington caused ‘tremendous’ amount of stress
Common chemical in tires caused mass Coho salmon deaths in Puget Sound, scientists say
‘Once-in-a-lifetime project’ will connect Puyallup to Port of Tacoma
‘Love your children; love them for who they are’: Family remembers trans advocate a year after murder

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
RSV surge, hospital overcapacity issues persist ahead of Thanksgiving

KOMO 4 TV (ABC)
Parents raise concerns after threats closed Meridian Elementary School for four days
Outreach workers say resource event could draw in new homeless clients

Q13 TV (FOX)
Biden’s student loan forgiveness: A timeline of legal challenges facing the plan

Web

Crosscut
The Asian Hall of Fame honors its first Indigenous inductee

MyNorthwest
Adderall shortage causes some to look to alternate treatments
Flu season wreaking havoc on kids in Washington state
Seattle City Council’s proposed budget includes $500M for affordable housing; vote next week
Study: Renters need to work longer hours to afford rent

The Stranger
Council Rejects Progressive Tax Increase to Fill $140 Million Budget Hole

West Seattle Blog
FOLLOWUP: Another near-record year for salmon spawners in Fauntleroy Creek – with other records set

Tuesday, November 22

Op-Art

Creating a Washington economy that works for all by helping small businesses
The Washington State Department of Commerce recently published a report examining the current landscape of small business support, referred to as technical assistance. Technical assistance programs provide training and guidance to help small businesses succeed, as well as share resources and education to help entrepreneurs tap into government and philanthropic aid programs. Surveying technical assistance providers from across the state, the report is the first ever exploration of how such providers responded to the pandemic, the gaps that exist in support, and how we can prioritize state and philanthropic resources to fill those gaps, especially for businesses furthest from opportunity. Continue reading at The Seattle Times. (Donna Grethen)


Congressional Progressive Caucus Chair Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., speaks during a news conference with newly elected incoming members of the CPC at the AFL-CIO building in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, November 13, 2022

Rep. Jayapal: Kroger merger will ‘hurt consumers, workers’
U.S. Representative Pramila Jayapal (WA-07) is calling for a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) investigation into Kroger’s proposed acquisition of Albertsons. It would combine the country’s two largest grocery store chains under one name. Kroger currently owns Fred Meyer and QFC, while Albertsons operates Safeway and Haggen. Representative Jayapal says the merger wouldn’t be good for the average American. “The acquisition would threaten competition and hurt consumers, workers, and small businesses. It presents several anti-competitive concerns, including fewer product choices and higher costs,” Jayapal said in a statement. The merger creates a company encompassing nearly 5,000 stores, reaching approximately 85 million households across the U.S. Kroger would own a share of the U.S. grocery market second to only Walmart. Continue reading at My Northwest. (Tom Williams)


PhotoAltText

Judge orders Amazon to stop retaliations against organizers
A federal judge has ordered Amazon to stop retaliating against employees engaged in workplace activism, issuing a mixed ruling that also hands a loss to the federal labor agency that sued the company earlier this year. The ruling came in a court case brought by the National Labor Relations Board, which sued Amazon in March seeking the reinstatement of a fired employee who was involved in organizing a company warehouse on Staten Island, New York. On Friday, U.S. District Judge Diane Gujarati ruled there was “reasonable cause” to believe the e-commerce giant committed an unfair labor practice by firing Bryson. She issued a cease-and-desist order directing the Seattle-based company to not retaliate against employees involved in workplace activism. Continue reading at Associated Press. (Craig Ruttle)


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Associated Press
Judge orders Amazon to stop retaliations against organizers

Auburn Reporter
TDOR honors victims of anti-transgender violence

Bellingham Herald
Life of Idaho stabbing victim remembered at Mount Vernon memorial
Emails at WWU encouraged violence against Black students
Whatcom will see weather Tuesday that might seem unusual
 
Capital Press
Black Sea grain initiative extension stabilizes wheat prices

Columbian
Editorial: In Our View: With elections, if you don’t play you can’t win

Everett Herald
Air quality burn ban issued for Snohomish County
Comment: U.S. adoption policy has harmed families, children
Editorial: Reduce cannabis business as target for crime

International Examiner
An expanded Filipinx American History and ethnic studies curriculum launches in Seattle Public Schools

Kent Reporter
Kent City Council approves status quo biennial budget for 2023-2024

Kitsap Sun
State’s budget forecast grows despite recession worries

News Tribune
Western State employees who got $2M for patient attacks sue again for records violations

Olympian
The Evergreen State is losing its trees. Here’s how Washington DNR aims to change that
CenturyLink must pay $226,000 penalty for failing to disclose rate changes, state says

Puget Sound Business Journal
As inflation soars, here’s how Seattle ranks for affordability
Providence posts operating loss of $1.1B so far this year
Despite mass layoffs, startups are still competing for tech recruits

Seattle Medium
UW Center Launches Community Conversations On Black Capitalism

Seattle Times
Seattle LGBTQ+ community on edge after Colorado nightclub shooting
Washington’s special education age limit is illegal, lawsuit claims
After record-breaking Seattle dry spell, here comes the rain
Opinion: Creating a Washington economy that works for all by helping small businesses

South Seattle Emerald
Indigenous Resources to Decolonize Thanksgiving; COVID-19 Services for the Holiday Season

Spokesman Review
Sen. Maria Cantwell, Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers and NASA astronaut Anne McClain discuss women in leadership at Northwest Passages event

Tri-City Herald
Weather Alert | Freezing rain, maybe snow, forecast for Eastern WA and Tri-Cities
Surge of respiratory infections in Tri-Cities expected. ER capacity a concern
Tri-Cities pizza restaurant to pay $11,000 for refusing service to disabled customer

Walla Walla Union Bulletin
Walla Walla City Council narrows focus in city manager search to one candidate

Washington Post
LGBTQ club shooting suspect’s troubled past was obscured by a name change, records show
Army veteran recounts subduing gunman at Colorado LGBTQ club

Yakima Herald-Republic
Groundbreaking on new Prosser hospital set for Nov. 29
Audit shows improper payments to Toppenish Superintendent John M. Cerna and his son

Broadcast

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
‘A broken system’: Dozens in Washington could get thousands of dollars waiting in jail for treatment

Web

Crosscut
This year’s Thanksgiving turkey will cost you more. Here’s why

MyNorthwest
Inflation, supply issues limit donations to Seattle food banks
Jury selection begins for Pierce County Sheriff trial
Rep. Jayapal: Kroger merger will ‘hurt consumers, workers’

The Stranger
The Meaningless Fight about Where to House Seattle’s Parking Cops Is Over … for Now

West Seattle Blog
FOLLOWUP: Stormwater facility by 1st Avenue South Bridge ready to run
GROCERY MERGER: Rep. Jayapal announces in West Seattle that she’s seeking federal investigation
DEVELOPMENT: 31-townhouse project for north Junction site

Monday, November 21

Law enforcement personnel stand outside of the scene of a mass shooting at Club Q, a gay bar in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022. A 22-year-old gunman opened fire in the gay nightclub, killing at least five people and leaving multiple others injured before he was subdued by “heroic” patrons and arrested by police who were on the scene within minutes, authorities said Sunday.

Gay club shooting suspect evaded Colorado’s red flag gun law
A year and a half before he was arrested in the Colorado Springs gay nightclub shooting that left five people dead, Anderson Lee Aldrich allegedly threatened his mother with a homemade bomb. Yet despite that scare, there’s no record prosecutors ever moved forward with felony kidnapping and menacing charges against Aldrich, or that police or relatives tried to trigger Colorado’s “red flag” law that would have allowed authorities to seize the weapons and ammo the man’s mother says he had with him. Gun control advocates say Aldrich’s June 2021 threat is an example of a red flag law ignored, with potentially deadly consequences. El Paso County appears especially hostile to the law, joining nearly 2,000 counties nationwide in declaring themselves “Second Amendment Sanctuaries”. Continue reading at Associated Press. (Parker Seibold)


Traffic is lined up at the railroad crossing at Trent and Pines on Friday. A bipartisan infrastructure deal has provided $24.4 million so far to replace the at-grade crossing.

Getting There: A year later, bipartisan infrastructure law has sent $3.7 billion to Washington, $1.1 billion to Idaho
A year after Congress passed landmark bipartisan legislation to revamp the nation’s ailing infrastructure, the bill has delivered $3.7 billion in Washington state – including $51.5 million in Spokane County – according to figures from the White House. President Joe Biden signed the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act into law Nov. 15, 2021, marking the culmination of years of bipartisan efforts to address one of the rare priorities on which Republicans and Democrats largely agreed. Sen. Maria Cantwell, a Washington Democrat who chairs the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and authored parts of the bill, celebrated the anniversary in a statement Tuesday. “This is a once-in-a-generation investment in infrastructure and it couldn’t have come at a more crucial time.” Continue reading at The Spokesman Review. (Kathy Plonka)


Democratic Rep. Sharon Shewmake narrowly defeated Republican Sen. Simon Sefzik in the Nov. 8 election to flip Sefzik’s 42nd Legislative District seat. Democrats won all three legislative seats in the swing district, which sprawls through Whatcom County.

Republicans hit blue wall in WA: Meet your new state Legislature
Republicans hit a blue wall in the Washington state Legislature election this month, repulsed by Democrats who continue to build power in Olympia. While Marie Gluesenkamp Perez made noise nationally with a U.S. House upset and Patty Murray silenced her doubters with her sixth straight U.S. Senate victory, Democrats lower down on the Nov. 8 ballot quietly bolstered their control over the Washington state Legislature, setting the stage for an action-packed lawmaking session that opens less than two months from now. Continue reading at The Seattle Times. (Daniel Kim)


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Associated Press
US supply chain under threat as unions, railroads, clash
Oregon, California and Washington oppose natural gas pipeline expansion in Pacific Northwest
Gay club shooting suspect evaded Colorado’s red flag gun law

Bellingham Herald
As Bellingham expands EV charging stations, this is what drivers will pay. 
Rising number of kids missing school as respiratory illnesses continue to spread. 
Whatcom County could see major impacts amid potential grocery merger. 

Columbian
Editorial: In Our View: Be cautious amid viruses this Thanksgiving
Editorial: In Our View: Support for light rail depends on transparency

The Daily News
Longview’s Lower Columbia College — like community colleges nationwide — sees enrollment drops
Comment: Election shows most parents content with child’s public school

Everett Herald
State’s Native American crisis hotline is first in the nation
Edmonds eyes speed cameras near three schools
Breaking it down: How consumers can cash in on federal climate bill
For beavers, tall dams don’t always make good neighbors
You’re in! With 3.0 GPA, many students can now punch ticket to college
Comment: Native American children again under threat
Editorial: Friction provides no warmth to homeless in county

News Tribune
Western State employees who got $2M for patient attacks sue again for records violations

Olympian
Rising numbers of kids missing school as respiratory illnesses continue to spread
At a pizza party for mental health, WA farmers find community amid stress
Friday’s I-5 carjacking suspect was fatally shot at the scene, Thurston Coroner says
Dry November, out of season fires in Western WA, and a burn ban. Rain coming, but not much
Dude, where’s my catalytic converter? Probably back in the supply chain

Puget Sound Business Journal
Why businesses should pay attention to the growing Latino market
Four-day workweeks becoming serious consideration

Seattle Medium
Facebook, Amazon Letting Seattle Workers Go

Seattle Times
Republicans hit blue wall in WA: Meet your new state Legislature (Lovick, Wilson, Randall, Shewmake, Rule, Lekanoff, Billig, Jinkins)
How a Kitsap County hospital illustrates WA’s emergency care crisis
Jury selection begins in trial of Pierce County Sheriff Ed Troyer

Spokesman Review
Getting There: A year later, bipartisan infrastructure law has sent $3.7 billion to Washington, $1.1 billion to Idaho
Spokane County commits $500,000 for Trent Avenue homeless shelter
Spokane City Council to consider a cap on what food delivery services can charge restaurants
Washington wildlife commission strikes down recreational spring bear hunt

Tri-City Herald
Monday morning commute may be icy. Tri-Cities under air stagnation advisory. 
WA pediatrician shares tips to battle child respiratory infection and stay out of ER. 
Dude, where’s my catalytic converter? Probably back in the supply chain. 

Washington Post
Officials probe whether Colorado Springs shooting was a hate crime

Yakima Herald-Republic
It Happened Here: WSDOT to rename I-90 rest areas near Cle Elum

Broadcast

KING 5 TV (NBC)
Meridian Elementary reopens with added safety measures following lockdown
November wildfires putting strain on state resources

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
4 dead after plane crashes, catches fire in field near Snohomish during test flight
Snohomish County PUD releases stats showing severity of early November storm

KOMO 4 TV (ABC)
9-year-old shot in road-rage incident welcomed home; WSP says suspect vehicle was stolen
Enrollment stabilizing at community colleges after pandemic drop, reports show

Web

MyNorthwest
Ferry staff could have stopped deaths from DUI crash, lawsuit alleges
State commissioner of public lands Franz announces end to net pen aquaculture
Seattle-based tech companies continue layoffs, ‘adjustments will be made’

West Seattle Blog
WEST SEATTLE WILDLIFE: Suspected local case of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza, and what you need to know about it
MONDAY: One more chance to speak out about city spending plan