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Tuesday, July 9

McLendon Hardware store manager Chris Blanchette helps John Woods browse air conditioning units in White Center on Friday. Woods’ air conditioner broke and he was considering buying a new one. (Audrey Richardson / The Seattle Times)

A costly cool: Seattle residents turn to AC during heat wave
With Puget Sound region temperatures in the 90s, box fans aren’t cutting it. Residents are turning to something that was once as un-Seattle as umbrellas and honking in traffic: air conditioning. But the cost of cooling can run into the thousands of dollars for installation, and it comes with higher electricity bills. In recent years, thousands of low-income Washington residents have received free air conditioners or energy assistance through city and state programs. Government incentives have also been made available for heat pumps, which can cool homes as well as heat them but cost anywhere from $8,000 to more than $40,000 to install. Continue reading at The Seattle Times. (Audrey Richardson)


Scammers are at work again, WA state officials say. Here’s what you need to know
A new scam is targeting area residents, the state Department of Transportation announced via social media on Monday. The scam, apparently sent by text and email, asks those who received it to pay an unpaid balance tied to the Good to Go! program, which is a pass used by commuters who regularly cross the Tacoma Narrows bridge. WSDOT officials urge residents to not click on unknown links in emails or texts. Continue reading at The Olympian. (Getty Images)


The Washington state Capitol building. (Bill Lucia/Washington State Standard)

Union votes herald a new era for workers in Washington Legislature
The stage is set for the first-ever contract negotiations between Washington state lawmakers and some of their most trusted employees. Democratic staff in the state House and Senate voted overwhelmingly to unionize Monday, joining their Republican peers in both chambers who elected to form bargaining units last month. Conversations about collective bargaining for legislative employees date back more than a decade. But it wasn’t until a 2022 law that Washington joined Oregon and Maine in offering legislative staff the opportunity to unionize. Continue reading at The Washington State Standard. (Bill Lucia)


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Aberdeen Daily World
Aberdeen city council unanimously extends homeless notice to vacate to 30 days

Axios
Seattle heat waves are longer, hotter and more frequent
Biden-era worker protections are on shakier ground after Supreme Court ruling

Bellingham Herald
Power supplier asks customers to limit use of electricity from 4-8 p.m. today due to heat
Bellingham Police Department bolsters staffing; city rejoins Whatcom County drug task force
City removes racist graffiti from Bellingham elementary school known for diverse enrollment

Capital Press
Wildfire season off to a fast start in hot weather
EPA, DOJ sue three Lower Yakima Valley dairies
Federal heat rule mulled to better protect workers
Company proposes to put batteries on farmland in Western Washington

Columbian
New Woodland Community Library nears completion
Rent inflation remains a pressure point for small businesses
City removes racist graffiti from Bellingham elementary school known for diverse enrollment

Everett Herald
Everett edges 14-year-old unofficial temperature record
One of Snohomish County’s most popular trails to close for 3 months
Boeing agrees to plead guilty to felony in deal with Justice Department

Federal Way Mirror
Investigation reviews FWPD’s crime reporting

International Examiner
Japanese Americans angered by decision to approve wind farm at Minidoka

News Tribune
One of the worst invasive species threatens WA waters. Here’s what to do if you see it

Olympian
Scammers are at work again, WA state officials say. Here’s what you need to know

Puget Sound Business Journal
FTC noncompete ban suffers setback
Boeing to plead guilty to fraud charges, pay $244M fine

Seattle Times
A costly cool: Seattle residents turn to AC during heat wave
Pierce County Council member won’t sit in chambers over pride flag
Bellevue middle schoolers over the moon about winning NASA challenge

Skagit Valley Herald
Concrete Town Council agrees to settle long-running dispute

Spokesman Review
Seniors and unhoused people are most at risk during heat wave
Spokane City Council approves local gun control, expanding on state law

Tri-City Herald
West Nile virus is back in Eastern WA. People and horses should take these precautions
One of the worst invasive species threatens WA waters. Here’s what to do if you see it

Washington Post
U.S. officials plan to kill 450K invasive owls that are endangering native owls

WA State Standard
WA suspends intakes at two youth detention centers 
Union votes herald a new era for workers in Washington Legislature

Wenatchee World
Authority eyes $3.8M annual infrastructure boost
Confluence Parkway project open house next week
Douglas County faces $20.5M revenue reduction over 25 years amid tense TIF discussions, while Port
Wildfire Roundup | Fires in Wenatchee Valley contained, Pioneer Fire grows, ODESZA show sparks fire

Yakima Herald-Republic
West Nile virus found in mosquito pool in Lower Yakima Valley

Broadcast

KING 5 TV (NBC)
Washington snowpack already mostly melted heading into heat wave
Mercer Island says mandatory water restrictions could be enacted if use doesn’t decrease
The challenges people of color face in accessing mental healthcare during, after pregnancy
‘This is literally deadly’: King County homelessness agencies activate emergency response amid heat wave

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
Residents asked to conserve power in extreme heat
Spikes in water usage, Mercer Island calls for immediate conservation
Tacoma attorney who represents victims’ families reacts to Boeing settlement
House to consider GOP backed bill would require proof of citizenship to register to vote
Washington families to receive millions in settlement from chicken price-fixing scandal

KOMO 4 TV (ABC)
Seattle’s air conditioning usage rises amid escalating ‘heat island’ effect
Mercer Island urges immediate water conservation as reservoir levels drop swiftly

KXLY (ABC)
Spokane City Council approves early retirement plan for police

Web

Cascadia Daily News
Campfires banned in North Cascades National Park starting Friday

Crosscut
It’s getting harder for PNW residents to access public records

MyNorthwest
Stretch of SR 11 Highway buckles under extreme heat
‘Very concerning position’: Mercer Island nears crisis with water shortage
Alaska Airlines flight attendants win big contract; Vote to ratify set for August

Monday, July 8

Nearly 60 years ago, the Kwoneesum Dam was built to create a recreational lake for a summer camp, blocking over 6 miles of fish habitat along the Washougal River. Soon the dam will be removed and coho salmon and summer steelhead will swim freely again. (Jarrette Werk / Underscore + Report for America)

Why ‘deadbeat dam’ removals are so difficult in WA, PNW
Kwoneesum Dam once had a purpose. It created a lake for girls attending a summer camp to swim, canoe and sail. But just two decades after the dam was built in the mid-1960s, the camp closed, and the land was sold to a timber company. Kwoneesum is just one example of the dams that have outlived their usefulness. These aging structures, dubbed “deadbeat dams” by some working toward their removal, choke off habitat, and threaten homes in some instances. It’s a problem gaining more recognition across the country. Continue reading at The Seattle Times (Jarrette Werk)


A sign at one of the boundaries of the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. (U.S. Forest Service)

WA counties to receive nearly $30M in payments for tax-exempt federal land
Washington’s counties will share close to $30 million in payments this year from the U.S. government to compensate them for untaxable federal land within their boundaries. The Interior Department last week announced $621.2 million in Payments in Lieu of Taxes for state and local governments nationwide. How much each place receives depends on the number of acres of federal land in the jurisdiction and its population. Continue reading at The WA State Standard. (U.S. Forest Service)


State department suspends intake at 2 juvenile rehab facilities in Washington
The Washington Department of Children, Youth and Families (DCYF) announced Saturday that it has suspended intake at two juvenile rehab facilities due to overcrowding and safety concerns. “When too many young people are concentrated in small spaces, it can escalate behaviors and limit the ability for therapeutic rehabilitation,” said Secretary Ross Hunter. “This was not sustainable. Our facilities must be safe, therapeutic, and functional.” Continue reading at King 5.


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Aberdeen Daily World
County Commission extends veteran’s ombudsman contract

Axios
Seattle apartments keep getting smaller
Boeing to plead guilty to fraud over 737 Max crashes
Warmest June on record hits Earth, boosting odds of warmest year 

Capital Press
‘Armchair engineer’ sees bigger goal behind Snake River dam controversy
During harvest, judge restores prevailing wages for Washington farmworkers

Columbian
Washington shoring up aquatic invasive species program
Department of Ecology poised to begin $160M cleanup of Bellingham inlet
10 years ago Clark County feared refer madness; today legal marijuana is a main street business

Everett Herald
Project aims to restore fish habitat to the Pilchuck River
COVID pills ‘sold out everywhere’ in Snohomish County, patients say
Comment: Loss of Supreme Court’s legitimacy can lead to violence
Comment:  Veterans of all eras should know about asbestos threat

Kitsap Sun
Supreme Court decision on homeless camping changes sweeps. What will that mean in Kitsap?

News Tribune
Ex-Gig Harbor teacher is accused of child molestation. What happens to his certificate?
County emphasizes rapid rehousing as $17.6M doled out to homelessness service providers

Puget Sound Business Journal
New business surge continues despite high interest rates
Seattle council committee advances amended office-to-housing bill
Seattle council members back watered down office-to-housing proposal

Seattle Times
Seattle Public Schools closes deficit and approves budget
Why ‘deadbeat dam’ removals are so difficult in WA, PNW
WA’s sweet cherry industry hit by natural disasters, sour market
WA suspends taking in sentenced youth at two detention centers
Sue Rahr’s approach as Seattle police chief: Move in, clean up, move on

Spokesman Review
Amid nationwide struggle to rebound school attendance to pre-COVID numbers, one school district stands out

Washington Post
Boeing will plead guilty to fraud related to fatal 737 Max crashes
Inside America’s billion-dollar quest to squeeze more trees into cities
No one had ever charged a school shooter’s parents with homicide. She did it anyway.

WA State Standard
Making WA’s long-term care program optional will create costs for state
WA counties to receive nearly $30M in payments for tax-exempt federal land
In Wenatchee Valley, seniors in need of affordable housing face long waits and cultural barriers
Northwest ecosystems changed dramatically when wolves were nearly exterminated, study finds

Whidbey News-Times
Mayor closes carnival for weekend after ride caused injuries

Broadcast

KING 5 TV (NBC)
Authorities investigating shooting involving Federal Way police
Here’s what you should know about the Ballard Bridge construction
State department suspends intake at 2 juvenile rehab facilities in Washington
A scam text message posing as the Good To Go! service is targeting Washington drivers
Boeing accepts plea deal to avoid criminal trial over 737 Max crashes, Justice Department says

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
Kitsap Transit awarded $17 million to upgrade aging facility
Level 3 evacuations expanded for Pioneer Fire along Lake Chelan as fire grows
Intakes suspended at DCYF juvenile facilities due to safety concerns over rising numbers
Persistent heat wave in the US expected to shatter new records as it bakes West and swelters in East

KOMO 4 TV (ABC)
Ballard Bridge construction begins, expect closures and added travel time

KNKX Public Radio
Citizens face growing obstacles to public records — and Northwest legislators are making them worse

KUOW Public Radio
Asylum-seekers living outdoors brace for Seattle-area heat wave
Hundreds in Seattle become U.S. citizens on Independence Day

KXLY (ABC)
Controversy follows Washington transgender athlete named champion
All extracurriculars on the chopping block at Moses Lake School District

Web

Cascadia Daily News
Bellingham airport pursuing larger role in Northwest Washington air travel

MyNorthwest
Kitsap Transit awarded $17 million to upgrade aging facility

Friday, July 5

Jarold Mancia and his wife Carleigh pose for a portrait outside of their Tacoma home, where they are raising four children. The couple hope an executive order by President Joe Biden will provide legal status to Jarold, a former police officer in El Salvador who came to the country unlawfully. “It opens a lot of doors for... (Audrey Richardson / The Seattle Times)

Biden’s undocumented spouses order could ‘change everything’ for some in WA
On June 18, President Joe Biden issued an executive order that grants protection to many undocumented spouses of American citizens who have lived in the U.S. for at least 10 years. An estimated 12,000 spouses of American citizens in Washington and 500,000 nationally could benefit from the order, along with any of their children who aren’t U.S. citizens. Biden’s action not only protects qualifying individuals from deportation but allows them a much easier path to getting permanent legal residency. Continue reading at The Seattle Times. (Audrey Richardson)


(Photo by Stephen Zenner/Getty Images)

Court fight tests WA’s protections for tenants threatened with eviction
When a tenant in Washington faces eviction, it’s possible they can reach a settlement agreement with their landlord that allows them to stay in their home. A state law approved in 2021 bars these agreements from forcing renters to waive certain protections – things like rights to mediation of tenant-landlord disagreements, rent repayment plans, and 14-day eviction notices. That law is now getting tested by litigation that is on the verge of landing before the state Supreme Court. Continue reading at The Washington State Standard. (Stephen Zenner)


Marvin Cox, community outreach director with the Metropolitan Action Commission on June 25, in Nashville. As temperatures reached into the upper 90s, the Metro Action Commission was offering free window AC units to seniors, families with young children and people with medical conditions.

As heat waves intensify, more public housing residents may get help with AC bills
The summer has already been a scorcher and heat alerts across the country could lead to more records broken. Public housing residents, many elderly, children or sick, are disproportionately vulnerable to heat illness, yet there’s no federal mandate to provide them air conditioning. In fact, until last month the Department of Housing and Urban Development allowed local housing agencies to subsidize tenants’ heating bills, but — with some exceptions — explicitly said they could not pay for cooling bills. Continue reading at KUOW. (AP)


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Auburn Reporter
Auburn woman begs city to act on frequent gunfire

Axios
Barred owls on the chopping block
Schools ban phones, but do the policies work?
West Coast faces record temps as 150M under heat alerts across U.S.

Capital Press
Amid harvest, judge restores prevailing wages for Washington farmworkers
Smokey Bear Turns 80: Furry icon part of long-running fire-prevention campaign

Columbian
Air quality in much of Clark County falls into unhealthy range

Courier-Herald
Opinion: WA, Oregon newspaper cuts show why press support is needed | The Free Press Initiative

Everett Herald
Edmonds ditches $37M Landmark public park project off Highway 99
Snohomish County stream team bushwhacks a path to healthier waterways
Comment: Supreme Court has ruled; now Congress must act

Federal Way Mirror
Ghost gun found on student at Todd Beamer High School

The Inlander
 It’s not just humans — dogs in Spokane are also overdosing on drugs

News Tribune
Pierce County Council member refuses to sit in chambers because Pride flag ‘distracting’
WA had over 55 tons of trash on beaches last July 5. Experts say this year could be worse
Doctor based at JBLM faces dozens of sexual-abuse charges. There are 41 alleged victims       
Tacoma spending $2.2M on Police Department report takers. Will they help reduce crime?       
Comment: The Supreme Court has spoken. Time for Tacoma to get tough on public camping       

Olympian
WA State Supreme Court sides with city of Lacey on parking limit for RVs

Puget Sound Business Journal
Microsoft conducts another round of layoffs
More Washington public companies are ‘going dark’

Renton Reporter
Renton Police Department accredited by top state agency

Seattle Times
Health officials alert possible measles exposures in King County
Stakes, and costs, growing in WA’s fight against Kroger-Albertsons merger
Biden’s undocumented spouses order could ‘change everything’ for some in WA

South Whidbey Record
Opinion: Sound Off: State Ferries need to improve decision making

Spokesman Review
Why U.S. government may still do business with Boeing, even as a felon
Brown commits to ‘Safe Streets Now,’ finally relaunching Spokane’s delayed traffic officer unit

Washington Post
Cancer deaths are down. So why does cancer scare us so much?
General Motors to pay nearly $146 million for excess car emissions
A covid summer uptick is underway as FLiRT and LB.1 variants ascend
FDA to ban BVO, an additive found in some fruity sodas and sports drinks
Economy adds 206,000 jobs in June, reflecting continued resilience in labor market

WA State Standard
‘Frustrating’ partisan stalemate: the new normal for farm bills?
Court fight tests WA’s protections for tenants threatened with eviction
Opinion: The best way to fight higher prices? Higher wages

Broadcast

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
Only on KIRO 7: On-board video of out of control Seattle bus crash
To save the spotted owl, wildlife officials want to kill hundreds of thousands of competing owls
4 SPD Officers file lawsuit against SPD, Seattle over sexual harassment and gender discrimination

KUOW Public Radio
As heat waves intensify, more public housing residents may get help with AC bills

KXLY (ABC)
Native Washington bird species listed as threatened
People told to evacuate now for 85 acre Balsam Root Fire near Wenatchee
Mayor Brown implements two initiatives to improve Spokane street safety

Web

Cascadia Daily News
Last year, hundreds of ballots were rejected in Whatcom County: Here’s why
Applications open for steering committee to help manage Nooksack water rights lawsuit

Crosscut
Federal project presents Yakama Nation with a double-edged sword
Out & Back: Reclaiming recreational spaces for BIPOC communities
WA Supreme Court upholds Lacey law limiting homeless RV parking
The Newsfeed: Malcolm Gladwell on America’s gun violence epidemic

Wednesday, July 3

Melanie Gonzalez gives kindergarten student Sawyer Watkins a high-five during a class exercise at Wahitis Elementary School in Othello, Adams County, on March 26. (Emree Weaver / Special to The Seattle Times)

How a rural WA school overcame the pandemic slump
During the pandemic, when schools across the country saw academic test scores plummet, scores at Wahitis Elementary improved. While Wahitis saw a drop in test scores the year following the pandemic, scores have rebounded to be on par with those recorded in 2018-19, which makes the school better off than most Washington public elementary schools. Wahitis continues to be a standout in the state, doing significantly better than other schools with high numbers of students from low-income families. Continue reading at The Seattle Times. (Emree Weaver)


April Sims, president of the Washington State Labor Council, spoke at the Activate 3.8 kickoff event Friday in Fremont. The campaign aims to expose young women in school to high-paying careers like tech and aerospace, connect women with existing resources, improve workplace conditions for women and increase female representation in leadership.

Inslee headlines kickoff event for statewide campaign to address gender pay gap
More than 100 people filled Nectar Lounge in Fremont on Friday to kick off Activate 3.8, a statewide campaign to address the gender pay gap. The campaign is a project of the Washington State Women’s Commission, a cabinet-level state agency signed into existence by Gov. Jay Inslee in 2018. According to a report from the National Partnership for Women and Families, women’s median earnings in Washington were $18,400 less than men’s in 2022. It was the second-widest gender pay gap in the country, topped only by Utah’s at $20,649. Continue reading at Puget Sound Business Journal. (CLAYMOREMACMEDIA)


Washington State Department of Agriculture strengthens local food system with grant
The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) awarded $1.5 million to strengthen the state’s local food system. Announced on Tuesday, the $1.5 million grant will support the infrastructure, supply chains and market access connected to the food supply system. A total of 337 applications were submitted by farmers, food processors, distributors, small businesses and organizations part of the supply chain in the state. Continue reading at KIRO 7. (Scott Olson)


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Aberdeen Daily World
Micro grants to help downtown Aberdeen businesses

Axios
The hottest days of the year are coming to Seattle

Capital Press
Farm groups celebrate demise of Chevron doctrine
On heels of Chevon decision, Supreme Court vacates rulings
‘Armchair engineer’ sees bigger goal behind Snake River dam controversy

Columbian
Low-income senior apartments with all-inclusive care planned in Felida
To save spotted owls, US officials plan to kill hundreds of thousands of another owl species

Everett Herald
Western Washington braces for ‘above normal’ wildfire season
State-funded scholarship helps Stanwood student go to college
Fourth of July heat wave to bring highs in 90s, stoking wildfire fears

Kent Reporter
New technology lets Renton Police track suspects in real time

News Tribune
See illegal fireworks? Report it online instead of calling 911 if it’s not an emergency
Firearms instructor, other Lakewood cops reprimanded for inadvertently firing their guns

Peninsula Daily News
McKinlley Paper Mill layoffs to have widespread impact
Opinion: PAT NEAL: The Fish Cop Employment Security Act

Port Townsend Leader
Algae-bloom leads to seafood harvest stop at three bays

Puget Sound Business Journal
Among small businesses, there’s a huge divide on finances
Judge dismisses Seattle homeowner’s challenge to city MHA law
Covid-era program fuels $300M in new funding to small businesses
Inslee headlines kickoff event for statewide campaign to address gender pay gap

Seattle Times
Declining number of kids in nearly all areas of WA
How a rural WA school overcame the pandemic slump
Seattle-area home values rebound, but offices take a hit
Judge dismisses lawsuit against Seattle’s affordable housing program

Skagit Valley Herald
Threatened North Cascades bird to be protected

Spokesman Review
Spokane tech hub project misses out in competition for federal funds

Washington Post
FDA approves Eli Lilly Alzheimer’s drug after months of delay
A covid summer uptick is underway as FLiRT and LB.1 variants ascend

WA State Standard
At least $5.5M in food and cash assistance lost to ‘alarming surge’ in card scams

Wenatchee World
Edgar Reinfeld tapped to head Wenatchee police
Wenatchee Valley Humane Society gets interim executive director

Broadcast

KING 5 TV (NBC)
Suspect dead after exchange of gunfire with law enforcement in Spanaway
To save spotted owls, US officials plan to kill hundreds of thousands of another owl species
Bullying, sexual harassment and discrimination lawsuit filed against Seattle Police Department
Seattle City Council will vote whether to send $1.5 billion transportation levy to November ballot

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
Ahead of July 4 travel rush, report shows surge of traffic deaths in Washington
Incidents of children falling from windows are on the rise in Snohomish County
Washington State Department of Agriculture strengthens local food system with grant

KOMO 4 TV (ABC)
Washington state’s population officially tops 8 million people
Washington’s new law targets spectators at illegal street races with fines, citations
4 female officers sue city of Seattle, SPD over gender discrimination and retaliation

KNKX Public Radio
A new federal rule could offer protection from extreme heat to millions of workers
After Supreme Court ruling, an advocate for homeless rights talks about what’s next

KUOW Public Radio
Most of Western Washington will see a rise in 2024 property values, but not everywhere

KXLY (ABC)
Housing assistance program reopens applications after eight years

Web

Cascadia Daily News
July Fourth fireworks leave environmental mess for Whatcom shoreline residents 
Upgrades ongoing at Post Point as city buys time to find better environmental solution

Crosscut
Seattle veterans clinic closes after mold, ceiling leak reports

MyNorthwest
4 female officers filing lawsuit against Seattle, SPD over discrimination, harassment

Tuesday, July 2

Mount Rainier seen from over the Crown Hill neighborhood during a warm and sunny afternoon in Seattle in March. A new program offers homebuying assistance to Washingtonians who faced housing discrimination in the early 20th... (Karen Ducey / The Seattle Times)

WA program to help first-time homebuyers with history of discrimination
Washington is undertaking a novel new attempt to address decades of housing discrimination. The state launched a program Monday offering homebuying assistance to Washingtonians who faced housing discrimination in the early to mid-20th century and their descendants. An explicit effort to redress the lasting effects of discrimination, the Covenant Homeownership Program could help hundreds of people of color become homeowners in Washington but may also face legal challenges. Continue reading at The Seattle Times. (Karen Ducey)


Undocumented Washingtonians can now work as doctors, teachers under new professional licensing law
Starting Monday, undocumented people in Washington can apply for professional state licenses and certifications, such as those held by doctors, teachers, and engineers. That’s because of a bill passed earlier this year. The new law opens the door to dozens of new career options for undocumented people. But some state agencies have already been issuing professional licenses to that demographic. Continue reading at KUOW. (Hush Naidoo Jade)


A list of new laws took effect across Washington state on July 1. (AP Photo/Lindsey Wasson, File)

Wave of new laws take effect in Washington state
Multiple laws went into effect in Washington state Monday including allowing punishment for “stealthing” and creating an opioid prevention and treatment account for Tribal communities. Continue reading at KOMO. (Lindsey Wasson)


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Aberdeen Daily World
Multiple vehicles struck in road rage shooting near McCleary

Axios
Major Supreme Court rulings hit regulators from multiple angles

Bellingham Herald
It’s a challenging drive to WA’s ocean beaches as state spends billions to help fish
City of Bellingham continues to install Portland Loos. Here’s where you’ll find new additions
New state estimate shows Bellingham population surpassing Kirkland, nearing top 10 in Washington

Capital Press
‘Armchair engineer’ talks Snake River dam controversy

Columbian
Total number of homeless in Clark County up 5%, Point in Time Count reports
Should gun store sales get special credit card tracking? States split on mandating or prohibiting it 

Everett Herald
Schools offer free summer meals for Snohomish County kids
US said to seek Boeing guilty plea to avoid trial in 737 Max crashes
Another Snohomish County child hurt in fall from third-story window
Comment: Court majority content to duck abortion issue for now

Kent Reporter
New mental health treatment facility opens in Renton (Hackney)
Muslim civil rights group calls for swift justice in Renton shooting

News Tribune
WA State Auditor’s Office finds fraud of nearly $900,000 at state agency
It’s a challenging drive to WA’s ocean beaches as state spends billions to help fish
Heavy traffic expected this week as Tacoma gears up for July 4. Here’s where to avoid

Puget Sound Business Journal
Boeing reaches deal to reacquire embattled supplier
Among small businesses, there’s a huge divide on finances
Valuations of King County office properties poised for steep drop

Seattle Times
PNW orcas won’t get separate species designation
Inside Sea-Tac’s efforts to clean up PFAS firefighting foams
Company sues WA over ban on at-home sexual assault evidence kits
WA auditor worried by growing ‘boldness’ with $900K misappropriation
WA program to help first-time homebuyers with history of discrimination

Skagit Valley Herald
Skagit County adopts revised strategic plan

Spokesman Review
$1.6 million in scholarships awarded to trades students in Washington
Medical Lake bans fireworks this year as Gray fire recovery continues, will host evening fireworks show

Tri-City Herald
Heat wave to wallop Tri-Cities. Temperature could top 100+ for days

Washington Post
OSHA proposes rule to protect workers exposed to extreme heat
60 years ago, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 changed American justice
Schools face a math problem: Money is running out and kids are still behind

WA State Standard
How the Washington state voter guide became a 110-year Democratic tradition
Presidential immunity extends to some official acts, Supreme Court rules in Trump case

Wenatchee World
The Brave Warrior Project: A lifeline for families of children with disabilities, but more help needed

Yakima Herald-Republic
Hillman fire in Yakima’s West Valley destroys 2 homes; evacuation levels lowered

Broadcast

KING 5 TV (NBC)
Audit discovers $878,000 in ‘misappropriated’ Washington state funds
Washington allows undocumented immigrants to apply for professional licenses (Walen)
Under pressure on plane safety, Boeing is buying stressed supplier Spirit for $4.7 billion
Washington State Ferries say boarding wait times may be longer than normal for Fourth of July holiday

KIRO 7 TV (CBS)
Armed teenagers arrested near Cleveland High School in South Seattle
Woman says she was victim of drive by shooting, says ‘abandoned’ by SPD

KOMO 4 TV (ABC)
Wave of new laws take effect in Washington state
WA becomes third state to allow punishment for ‘stealthing’

KNKX Public Radio
Coast Salish tribes enjoy the sweet revival of a camas harvest
JBLM servicemen say the Army didn’t protect them from abusive sexual contact

KUOW Public Radio
Before you spark up, know where fireworks are banned in western Washington
Undocumented Washingtonians can now work as doctors, teachers under new professional licensing law (Walen)

Web

Cascadia Daily News
Bellingham recommits police staff to Whatcom County drug task force
Bellingham approves nearly $350K for downtown beautification projects
City of Bellingham anticipates little change to homeless policy following Supreme Court ruling 

MyNorthwest
3 cars shot at in road rage shooting on State Route 8
Washington auditor sees biggest state employee fraud case in 15 years
Woman claims she was ‘abandoned’ by police after Columbia City shooting
‘Too many guns on the street:’ Local agencies respond to weekend filled with violence

Washington Observer
Doctors struggle to afford Medicaid patients. How can WA solve the problem? (Kuderer, Riccelli, Macri)